INTERIORIZE

MEMORIZE

RECALL

 

​VALUE

 

"[...] I was five or six years old but I remember well...the cotton burrs are dry, spiky and sharp soaring your hands, I still remember the sore on my fingertips. However, there was a competition on the harvest: the heavier the cotton sack, the more money you make. This never was easy, but we tried to enjoy the fields as there were little alternatives."

My Mom.

"vision and hearing are capable of providing reasonably fine-grained spatial and temporal information. each sensory system can provide ‘missing pieces’ [...] the visual system, although generally excellent at providing spatial information, cannot detect the locations of occluded objects, objects located beyond the field of view, or objects in the dark.
The auditory system is capable of filling in these lacunae."
Bulkin & Groh, 2006

As the Attitude-Behaviour Gap usually explains consumer behaviour, it is not only restricted to this one actor. However, in light of my in-depth consumer, retail, and supply chain research in the field, I observed this gap and heavy disconnection over many years among fashion managers and academics. While there has been a positive development in attitude, awareness and accountability towards environmental and social issues in the fashion industry, yet professionals lack of knowledge and insights about the entire supply chain they are engaged in. As a consequence, key decision-makers and top-managers who align the strategic direction of the fashion brand/retailer, but also key divisions for sustainable development e.g. Designers, Merchandisers, and Sourcing Managers ignore the far-reaching effects on their supply chains and the environment given their actions and decisions: their behaviour.

Therefore, Sound of Garments strives to bring the upstream supply chain closer to professionals and civil society by sharing deep insights from the researchers perspective, uplifting the suppliers voice and providing insights about the involved people and resources to emotionalize and highlight that the garments in our wardrobes are handcrafted, made by people who deserve more than just a minimum wage.

20191123_103312_edited_edited_edited_edi
Successful managers inform their decision making with science based input for three primary reasons:
 
evaluating performance, identifying problems, and uncovering opportunities.

It is vital for managers to embrace the combination of experience, knowledge and science-based insights to inform their strategic and operational decisions on sustainability.

My scrutiny started with the story of my mum. While studying Fashion management, the story inspired me to see the people behing each garment we wear daily. These stories were missing in the entire study.

highly disconnected. fashion designers, managers, and personnel literally dont know the supply chain processes behind each garment they create, market and sell.

 

I was five or six years old but I remember well...

 

the sound of the farm tractors is still in my ears, collecting all the people from the villages near by for cotton picking. Together with my mother and other relatives I joined the escort to the cotton farms since all the kids never have been left home alone. Arriving in the fields the farmers assigned us into groups and gave each these giant jute sacks. It was hot, incredibly hot, and kids have been usually asked to sit under trees to find shady places protected by the leafes. However, most of the kids wanted to help their mothers. I was never able to merely watch my mother filling the jute sacks under the burning sun, so I stepped over to help harvesting the cotton from the cracked bolls.

 

The cotton burrs are dry, spiky and sharp soaring your hands, I still remember the sore on my fingertips. However, there was a competition on the harvest: the heavier the cotton sack, the more money you make. This never was easy, but we tried to enjoy the fields as there were little alternatives."

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